How to Make a God in DnD 5e

Making a God in DnD 5e is quite a vague question. What “makes” a God in the first place?
But that’s a philosophical discussion for another day.

Today, we will be looking at answering the question of how to make a God, how to become a God, and what characteristics would a Godlike character have?

The nature of this question requires it to be split into two parts. One part is the Dungeon Master’s aspect of making a God figure before the story even begins.
And the other is the player’s aspect. How many a player go about becoming a God?

So let’s dive in and find out.

How to Make a God Character in DnD 5e as a DM

The answer to this question lies entirely up to the level of details you’d want to include into your diety.

In a previous article, we looked at how to write a DnD campaign, consider checking that one out before continuing.

Now, what should be included when creating a diety in your DnD world.
First of all, if you want to give the creature stats then all rules are off. You cannot keep it bound by the same parameters that other creatures are bound to. It must exceed all those, and any other limits imposed on regular creatures.

And now for the philosophical part.
Know beforehand which kind of diety it will be. This is important as different religions interact with their diety in different ways. A diety from a polytheistic pantheon will not interact with the world and its followers the same way a monotheistic deity will interact with the world and its followers.

After you’ve figured that part out, figure out which purpose you want to give it. No god, even in the real world, exists without a purpose.
Let’s take Zeus as an example from the real world. He is the god of the sky and lightning, furthermore, he is the head of Olympus. He is bound by all those attributes, and he cannot be something else. For that reason, do not include any contradictions in your diety.
Don’t make it all-powerful and make it use its power to break its own rules. Gods do not work like that, it’s absurd.

And finally, have a point with your deity. Don’t let it just exist in the background, have it have real implications and effects on the characters and the world that they inhabit.

How to Become a God as a Player

Now that we’ve talked about the process of creating a god, let’s talk about how to become one.

First of all. There are no rules regarding this process, so whatever you discuss with your DM, goes.
With that said, let’s cover the first possible way of becoming a god.

Ascension by lore reasons

One of the ways that you can ascend to godhood is by a certain lore reason. Maybe at the end of your adventures, your party ascends to become the new pantheon of the lands you saved from an evil demon lord who killed the previous pantheon.
Go wild with your imagination here, as there is literally nothing stopping you.

Ascension by ordainment

Another lore reason that you can use is ordainment. You may be ordained by the people or a very powerful figure, and by such – you can become a God.
Because, after all. What is a god without its believers?

Becoming a “God” through hard work

Now, this is a more literal list of things that you can do than the previous points.
The reason for that, and why God is in quotation marks is because you don’t really become a god – you just become really powerful.

To become a “God” in your campaign you will have to cheese… a lot.

But what do I mean by cheese?
DnD is a group game, a bunch of players gathered together to work towards a common goal. With cheesing, you exploit the game, and more often than naught; abandon any team-play whatsoever.

So here’s how you can go about that.
First of all, heavily specialize in a particular ability score for your class.
After that, hoard as many powerful items as you can.
And after that, cast as many spells and consume whichever items are required to increase your stats.
If other players are willing to help you, have them cast spells that buff you as well.

And that’s basically about as close to a God as you can get in DnD 5e. Go wild!

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