How to Write a DnD Campaign 5e

It’s time we have a look at how to Write a Campaign in DnD 5e. We previously looked at how to be a DM in another article. So this will be a natural continuation of that article.

Of course, there are way too many factors that can determine what makes up a well-written campaign in DnD. There are tons of things that you have to take into consideration. So, for a full explanation, it’s best to consult the Dungeon Master’s Guide. As the DMG is truly the best and most detailed source for most of the information we will cover here today.

Today though, we are only interested in outlining the most important elements when writing and creating your world in DnD 5e. And it’s only fair to outline what you can – and should do, regardless of your capabilities.

At the end of the day, you have to keep one thing in mind. The goal of your whole endeavor should be to have fun, and for it to be fun for everyone. If that hasn’t been achieved, then it can safely be said that you’ve failed.

Without further ado, let’s get into it.

How to Write a DnD 5e Campaign

There are certain elements that you should always take into consideration when writing your world. Starting with the mechanics of your world. This one is important for the following reason. Which mechanics and elements you chose to use and include in your campaign will determine what you can write about. If say you opt-out of using magical items in your world then you can’t write them in. So, before you’ve even started writing and shaping up your world – consult your players if they have any demands or desires.

Moving on. Let’s give each part its proper paragraph.

The World

The World is the most important element of any story. It’s what makes experiences memorable The more nuance and richness you can include – the better.
What I mean by this is the following. Not every story has to be cliche. And not every story has to follow the same boring old tropes. Sure you can have a campaign that goes from one medieval village to another with dungeons in between. But what about the cultures of those villages?

This is what I mean by adding nuance to your world. Your players will be captivated by your world much more if it challenges and intrigues them. Say in one village one of your players is shunned and discriminated against just because of the race they are playing. These kinds of engagements are what make a world memorable, as they are also sadly quite a common occurrence in our world. And the real world is nothing if not vibrant.

The Story

The story is the main thing that will get your players engaged. You must have it for the most part figured out before you even begin the campaign. Of course, unexpected events can occur during a campaign, if you’re capable of improvisation; include these into your story. Your players will appreciate you even more for it.
Each story has to have these 5 elements, so remember to always include them.

  1. Setting: If you’ve conceptualized your world up until this point, then you basically have this point covered.
  2. The Plot: Each story has to have a natural progression. So, when structuring your story see that it feels natural. What I mean by this is; you have to include a beginning, middle and end. Even if you play around with this arrangement, it must feel natural in the end.
  3. Characters: These are the many faces that inhabit your world. Your players are just some of them, the larger world should be filled with a variety of characters from all walks of life.
  4. Conflict: Every good story includes a conflict or two. It’s necessary for creating suspense and keeping the reader – or player in this case, engaged.
  5. Resolution: Every conflict must have an end. And so must every story, so try to create something memorable for the resolution.

Conclusion

That basically covers in short the most important elements when writing and building your DnD campaign. As I said in the beginning, for a more detailed guide it’s best to consult the Dungeon Master’s Guide, here we only looked at the most important elements that your story cannot do without.
So go out there. Learn more, include variety into your world; enriched the experience for everyone involved. And most importantly, remember to have fun.

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